Top 5 buildings by the late architect Kevin Roche

The innovative architect's designs include New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates

Kevin Roche, the Irish-born American architect behind such high-profile projects as the Metropolitan Museum of Art extension, the College Life Insurance Company pyramids in Indianapolis, and the Oakland Museum of California, has died at the age of 96. His firm, Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates, confirmed his death this morning.

In 1982, Roche was awarded the Pritzker Prize, architecture's most prestigious honor. His citation reads: “In this mercurial age, when our fashions swing overnight from the severe to the ornate, from contempt for the past to nostalgia for imagined times that never were, Kevin Roche's formidable body of work sometimes intersects fashion, sometimes lags fashion, and more often makes fashion. He is no easy man to describe: an innovator who does not worship innovation for itself, a professional unconcerned with trends, a quiet humble man who conceives and executes great works, a generous man of strictest standards for his own work. In this award to Kevin Roche, we recognize and honor an architect who persists in being an individual, and has for all of us, through his work and his person, made a difference for the better."

Here, Siweb presents Kevin Roche's five greatest buildings.

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1 The Oakland Museum (Oakland, CA)
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Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates

Completed in 1968

2 College Life Insurance Company (Indianapolis, IN)
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Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates

Completed in 1970

3 The Metropolitan Museum of Art Extension (New York City)
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Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates

Work began in 1967

4 General Foods Headquarters (Rye Brook, NY)
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Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates

Completed in 1983

5 Convention Centre Dublin (Dublin, Ireland)
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Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates

Completed in 2010

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